UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

SESSION 2017/2018

Section A. Basic Information

1 Title
 
 
Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery Graduate Entry Medicine
 
2 Course code
 
 
A101
 
3 School(s) Responsible For Management Of The Course
 
 
Medical Education Centre 100%
 
4 Type of course
 
 
Single Subject
 
5 Mode of delivery
 
 
Full time
 
6 Course Accreditation
 
 
General Medical Council (GMC) : Accredited by the General Medical Council (GMC), this primary medical qualification entitles the holder to apply to the GMC for registration to practise medicine in the UK.
 
7 Relevant QAA Subject Benchmark(s)
 
 
Medicine
 
Section B. General Information

Educational Aims
 
 
The University of Nottingham offers a four-year graduate entry course to students wishing to become doctors which is accredited and mapped to the outcomes for graduates specified by the General Medical Council in Outcomes for Graduates (2015). Overall the course has two components. The first part comprises learning and teaching in core biomedical and social sciences, clinical skills, and early clinical experience during an 18-month period through a PBL-based curriculum. In the second part of the course students join the five-year(A300) students to concentrate on full-time clinical training. At the end of this period successful students are awarded the Bachelor of Medicine and the Bachelor of Surgery degrees.
  • The aims of the course are that on qualification, doctors receiving the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degrees from Nottingham University should:

    1. Be able to apply to medical practice biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge relating to: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology and physiology. Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice. Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice. Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and health care.Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research(OfG 8-12);
    2. Be able to carry out a consultation with a patient; diagnose and manage clinical presentations; communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a medical context; provide immediate care in medical emergencies; prescribe drugs safely, effectively and economically; carry out practical procedures safely and effectively; and use information effectively in a medical context. (OfG 13-19)
    3. Be able to behave according to ethical and legal principles; reflect, learn and teach others; learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team; and protect patients and improve care (OfG20-23)li>
  •  
    Distinguishing Features
     
     
    The first 18 months employs a problem-based learning approach that incorporates an adult learning model and substantial emphasis on independent, self-directed learning. Clinical cases are used each week in conjunction with an explicit clinical reasoning model as the principal method of teaching and learning, supported by taught classes and clinical visits. Students work in small groups, usually with a staff facilitator, to formulate the problem, identify learning issues to guide study, generate hypotheses, plan inquiry, seek relevant evidence and reach initial diagnostic conclusions and management plans. This approach provides two important benefits - direct linkage between basic and clinical scientific knowledge and clinical practice; and development of effective teamwork and individual study skills. Integration of students from both full-time pre-clinical courses (the A100 BMedSci and the GEM part of A101 Graduate Entry Medicine) is a mutually enriching educational experience. Knowledge examinations use on-line methods developed and pioneered in Nottingham Medical School. Teaching and assessment of skills and attitudes uses methods modelled closely on those currently used in doctor appraisal.
     
    Section C. Supplementary Regulations

    1 Admission Requirements
     
     
    IELTS Requirements  7.5 (no less than 7.0 in any element)
    TOEFL IBT  109 (min 25 in any element)
    Pearson Academic  74


    Minimum requirement is the possession of a 1st or 2nd Class Bachelors (Honours) degree (or equivalent) in any subject. Application for the majority of places is only open to UK or EU citizens, or those have indefinite leave to remain* in the UK and have been resident in the EEA for purposes other than full-time study for at least three years before the start date. Prospective students are required to sit the GAMSAT examination. Students are then selected for interview on the basis of their GAMSAT score. Conditional offers are made on the basis of these selection criteria and are subject to satisfactory consideration of any health and conduct issues relevant to fitness to practise.
     
    2 Course Structure
     
     
    Modules Highlighted in Green will not be running in 2017/2018

    Qualifying Year
     Compulsory
     Students must take all modules in this group
     
    CodeTitleCreditsCompensatableTaught
    A12F1GGEM Foundation: structure, function & defence20NAutumn
    A12M1GGEM Limbs and Back30NSpring
    A12C1GGEM Cardiovascular sciences20NAutumn
    A12R1GGEM Respiratory sciences20NAutumn
    A12E1GGEM Endocrine system20NSpring
    A12P1GGEM Personal & professional development 130NFull Year
    A12A1GGEM Alimentary system20NSpring
     Credit Total160  
     

    Part I
     Compulsory
     Students must take all modules in this group
     
    CodeTitleCreditsCompensatableTaught
    A12N2GGEM Neurosciences30NAutumn
    A12P2GGEM Personal & professional development 220NAutumn
    A13CLPClinical Phase 1 - Clinical Practice15NSpring
    A13CFUClinical Phase 1 - Community Follow-up Project5NSpring
    A13THPClinical Phase 1 - Therapeutics5NSpring
    A12U2GGEM Urogenital system30NAutumn
    A12I2GGEM Integrative module20NAutumn
     Credit Total125  
     

    Part II
     Compulsory
     Students must take all modules in this group
     
    CodeTitleCreditsCompensatableTaught
    A14CP2Clinical Phase 2200NFull Year
     Credit Total200  
     

    Part III
     Compulsory
     Students must take all modules in this group
     
    CodeTitleCreditsCompensatableTaught
    A14ACEClinical Phase 3 - Advanced Clinical Experience180NFull Year
    A14TTPClinical Phase 3 - Transition To Practice20NSpring
     Credit Total200  
     
    Additional Components
     
    3 Assessment criteria
     
    All Supplementary or course Regulations should be read in the context of the relevant University Study Regulations .
     
    Please refer to this information on http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/regulations/ .
     


    Progression Information:

    GEM Course

    A range of assessment types are employed: unseen written and on-line examinations to test basic and clinical science, clinical reasoning, and professional development knowledge-related outcomes; OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) and/or certification for clinical skills related outcomes; portfolios for professional behaviour and attitudes related outcomes. Regular opportunity for formative assessment is provided.

    The summative assessments comprise:

    Year 1: Written MEQ (modified essay questions), based on clinical problems and on-line MCQ (multiple choice questions); certification of clinical skills (or an equivalent OSCE); portfolio.

    One opportunity to resit each failed examination or to resubmit unsatisfactory course work will be offered. Reassessment of the year 1 portfolio and/or year 1 examinations will be by the start of semester 1 in year 2. No compensation is allowable between the knowledge, skills and attitudinal assessments.

    Assessments will be criterion based: the required level of competence (RLC) and acknowledged excellence (AE).

    Progression to Year 2


    Candidates who have not passed all their GEM summative assessments in year 1 will not be allowed to progress to year 2 of the course.

    Year 2 (end of semester 1): Written MEQ (modified essay questions), based on clinical problems, Clinical reasoning, and on-line MCQ (multiple choice questions); certification of clinical skills (or an equivalent OSCE); portfolio.

    One opportunity to resit each failed examination or to resubmit unsatisfactory course work will be offered. Resubmission of the year 2 portfolio will be by before the end of year 2 (Clinical Phase 1). No compensation is allowable between the knowledge, skills and attitudinal assessments.

    Assessments will be criterion based: the required level of competence (RLC) and acknowledged excellence (AE).

    Progression to Clinical Phase 1

    Candidates who fail any GEM summative assessment on the first occasion in Year 2 will be allowed to continue with Clinical Phase 1. Candidates who have not passed all their GEM summative assessments in years 1 and 2 will not be allowed to progress to Clinical Phase 2.

    Clinical course


    Progression in Clinical Phases 1, 2 and 3

    Candidates with failures in Clinical Phases 1, 2 or 3 shall have further opportunities to satisfy the examiners as follows:

    (i) Candidates who have failed a Clinical Phase 1 module (A13CLP knowledge and/or skills, A13THP knowledge and/or A13CFU coursework) shall resit the exam/s and/or coursework at the first available opportunity (usually in August/September). They can progress to Clinical Phase 2 pending the results of Resit 1. Once the results are published, if a student finds that they have failed Resit 1 exam and/or coursework exam they will have to suspend and retake the Clinical Phase 1 attachment and associated in-course assessments before being eligible to take a final attempt (Resit 2) of the failed exam and/or coursework. Failure to pass Resit 2 will result in termination of the course.

    Should a student fail a first sit examination then students who have provisionally progressed to CP2 will need to suspend their CP2 studies and undertake a RESIT 1 assessment at the next available opportunity (usually June the following academic year). If a student then fails a RESIT 1 assessment, they will have to retake the Clinical Phase 1 attachment and associated in-course assessments the following academic year, before being eligible to take a final attempt (Resit 2) of the failed exam and/or coursework. Failure to pass Resit 2 will result in termination of the course.

    (ii) Candidates who have failures at the first attempt in Clinical Phase 2 or 3, shall conform to the regulations as set out in the programme specification for the A300 BMBS course.
    Degree Information:
    By agreement this programme does not conform to the University of Nottingham Qualifications Framework.

    To qualify for the award of the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, candidates shall follow an approved Course of Study for either four years (graduate entry medicine) or five years.

    Candidates must have passed all elements of Clinical Phases 1, 2 and 3.

    Candidates must have been signed off as meeting requirements in regards to professionalism, including matters related to engagement, attitude, conduct and behaviour. In this respect while assessments are made at points defined in clinical attachments, a review of a student record may be made by a board of examiners and a determination may be made that learning outcomes in this domain are not being met close to the point of graduation, including the last attachment in the A14ACE module and in the A14TTP module. This reflects the fact that meeting outcomes for professionalism must be demonstrated continuously, and not merely at summative assessment points. In such cases a student will be deemed to have failed the phase and subject to regulation 4 (v) points 1-3 in the CP3 Phase A300 Programme Specification.

    The award of a distinction to a candidate for the assessment in an individual Attachment shall be determined by the Board of Examiners who shall have discretion to consider other information in addition to Examination marks.

    The degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery may be awarded as a pass, or a pass with Honours. A pass with Honours will be awarded to those candidates whose performance in Clinical Phases 2 and 3 is considered by the Board of Examiners to be outstanding as follows:

    a) Performance during Clinical Practice will not be taken into account when determining the award of Honours.

    b) Students will be awarded Honours based on single summation aggregated average of CP2 plus CP3. Honours will be awarded to those with a summated average of 70% or above. Rounding will be applied from 69.5%. Borderline considerations will also be taken at 68% as long as one of either the CP2 or CP3 overall averages is at 70% or above.

    c) Module marks contribute as follows:

    A14CP2 module: Knowledge (50%); Skills (50%)

    A14ACE module: Knowledge (50%); Skills (50%)

    d) The award of Honours would normally require that all module attachments had been completed without a need for a period of retraining in any attachment unless otherwise agreed by a Board of Examiners.

    e)The award of Honours would normally require that a student had not received a warning or caution under the Fitness to Practice procedure unless otherwise agreed by a Board of Examiners.

    The BMBS Board of Examiners may exceptionally award Honours to students not meeting the above criteria but whose performance is nevertheless considered outstanding.

    NB From June 2007 the pass mark for assessments in Clinical Phases 2 and 3 is 50%.

    Fitness to Practise


    Progression in the course and the final award of BM, BS is dependent on fitness to practise. A student is not permitted to graduate while they are subject to ongoing fitness to practice investigation or awaiting outcome of a fitness to practice determination. If a student is judged unfit to practise by reason of health or conduct this will normally lead to a requirement to complete a further educational experience. In serious cases, their course may be terminated and the degree award refused. Where there are concerns about patients being placed at risk or the profession being brought into disrepute, the student may be excluded immediately from clinical placements by the Dean or nominated representative. More details about the fitness to practise procedures are available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/academicservices/qualitymanual/studyregulations/index.aspx

    Course Weightings %
    Degree Calculation Model: Arithmetic Mean
     
    4 Other regulations
     
     
    For Clinical Phase 2 and Clinical Phase 3 Regulations see A300 Programme Specification
     
     IMPORTANT INFORMATION Ė REGULATION CHANGES FROM SEPTEMBER 2015/16
     Notwithstanding the criteria set out in the Assessment section above, the following arrangements will apply to all students entering their Qualifying Year or Part I in, or after, the 2015/16 academic session.
     Degree classification will be determined by the Arithmetic Mean model.
     The final degree mark will be determined by a standardised weighting for a Bachelorís degree of 33/67 for Parts I and II respectively, and for an Integrated Masterís degree (undergraduate) of 20/40/40 for Parts I, II and III respectively.
     Borderline criteria will be applied as follows:
     
  • 2:1-1st / 68%, 69%
  •  
  • 2:2-2:1 / 58%, 59%
  •  
  • 3rd-2:2 / 48%, 49%
  •  A student should be given the higher class if either of the following criteria are met:
     
  • Half or more of the final stage credits are in the higher class
  •  
  • Half or more of the final and penultimate stage credits are in the higher class
  •  Transfer to an Ordinary Degree pathway will not be permitted on any of the Universityís campuses and the award of an Ordinary Degree on exit will only be permitted at UNUK and UNNC, but not at UNMC.
     Should a programme have different arrangements due to professional body requirements, details will be available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/regulations.
     A programme specification may state that students are required to meet an enhanced progression standard in order to remain on an Integrated Masters Programme. The standard enhanced progression requirement is 55% in Part I of the programme at the first attempt unless there is a specific named PSRB requirement stated above in the programme specification.
      
    Section D. Learning Outcomes
     
     
    Learning Outcomes are mapped to the GMC document Tomorrows Doctors (2009) [Paragraph numbers cited as TD from that document]
    Knowledge and Understanding
    Knowledge and understanding is divided into three sets of outcomes for the graduate:
    1. Scholar and Scientist
    2. Practitioner
    3. Professional
  • Outcomes 1: Scholar & Scientist
    OFG 8. The graduate will be able to apply to medical practice biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge relating to: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology and physiology. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Explain normal human structure and functions.
    (b) Explain the scientific bases for common disease presentations.
    (c) Justify the selection of appropriate investigations for common clinical cases.
    (d) Explain the fundamental principles underlying such investigative techniques.
    (e) Select appropriate forms of management for common diseases, and ways of preventing common diseases, and explain their modes of action and their risks from first principles.
    (f) Demonstrate knowledge of drug actions: therapeutics and pharmacokinetics; drug side effects and interactions, including for multiple treatments, long-term conditions and non-prescribed medication; and also including effects on the population, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance.
    (g) Make accurate observations of clinical phenomena and appropriate critical analysis of clinical data.
  • OFG 9. Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Explain normal human behaviour at an individual level.
    (b) Discuss psychological concepts of health, illness and disease.
    (c) Apply theoretical frameworks of psychology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.
    (d) Explain psychological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment.
    (e) Discuss psychological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.
    (f) Discuss adaptation to major life changes, such as bereavement. Compare and contrast the abnormal adjustments that might occur in these situations.
    (g) Identify appropriate strategies for managing patients with dependence issues and other demonstrations of self-harm.
  • OFG 10. Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Explain normal human behaviour at a societal level.
    (b) Discuss sociological concepts of health, illness and disease.
    (c) Apply theoretical frameworks of sociology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.
    (d) Explain sociological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment including issues relating to health inequalities, the links between occupation and health and the effects of poverty and affluence.
    (e) Discuss sociological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.
  • OFG 11. Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and health care. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Discuss basic principles of health improvement, including the wider determinants of health, health inequalities, health risks and disease surveillance.
    (b) Assess how health behaviours and outcomes are affected by the diversity of the patient population.
    (c) Describe measurement methods relevant to the improvement of clinical effectiveness and care.
    (d) Discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics and equity, and clinical guidelines.
    (e) Explain and apply the basic principles of communicable disease control in hospital and community settings.
    (f) Evaluate and apply epidemiological data in managing healthcare for the individual and the community.
    (g) Recognise the role of environmental and occupational hazards in ill-health and discuss ways to mitigate their effects.
    (h) Discuss the role of nutrition in health.
    (i) Discuss the principles and application of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of disease.4
    (j) Discuss from a global perspective the determinants of health and disease and variations in health care delivery and medical practice.
  • OFG 12. Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Critically appraise the results of relevant diagnostic, prognostic and treatment trials and other qualitative and quantitative studies as reported in the medical and scientific literature.
    (b) Formulate simple relevant research questions in biomedical science, psychosocial science or population science, and design appropriate studies or experiments to address the questions.
    (c) Apply findings from the literature to answer questions raised by specific clinical problems.
    (d) Understand the ethical and governance issues involved in medical research.
  • Outcomes 2: Practitioner
    OFG13. The graduate will be able to carry out a consultation with a patient:
    (a) Take and record a patient's medical history, including family and social history, talking to relatives or other carers where appropriate.
    (b) Elicit patients' questions, their understanding of their condition and treatment options, and their views, concerns, values and preferences.
    (c) Perform a full physical examination.
    (d) Perform a mental-state examination.
    (e) Assess a patient's capacity to make a particular decision in accordance with legal requirements and the GMC's guidance (in Consent: Patients and doctors making decisions together).
    (f) Determine the extent to which patients want to be involved in decision-making about their care and treatment.
    (g) Provide explanation, advice, reassurance and support.
  • OFG 14. Diagnose and manage clinical presentations.
    (a) Interpret findings from the history, physical examination and mental-state examination, appreciating the importance of clinical, psychological, spiritual, religious, social and cultural factors.
    (b) Make an initial assessment of a patient's problems and a differential diagnosis. Understand the processes by which doctors make and test a differential diagnosis.
    (c) Formulate a plan of investigation in partnership with the patient, obtaining informed consent as an essential part of this process.
    (d) Interpret the results of investigations, including growth charts, x-rays and the results of the diagnostic procedures in Appendix 1.
    (e) Synthesise a full assessment of the patient's problems and define the likely diagnosis or diagnoses.
    (f) Make clinical judgements and decisions, based on the available evidence, in conjunction with colleagues and as appropriate for the graduate's level of training and experience. This may include situations of uncertainty.

  • (g) Formulate a plan for treatment, management and discharge, according to established principles and best evidence, in partnership with the patient, their carers, and other health professionals as appropriate. Respond to patients' concerns and preferences, obtain informed consent, and respect the rights of patients to reach decisions with their doctor about their treatment and care and to refuse or limit treatment.
    (h) Support patients in caring for themselves.
    (i) Identify the signs that suggest children or other vulnerable people may be suffering from abuse or neglect and know what action to take to safeguard their welfare.
    (j) Contribute to the care of patients and their families at the end of life, including management of symptoms, practical issues of law and certification, and effective communication and teamworking.
  • OFG 15. Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a medical context.
    (a) Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with patients, their relatives or other carers, and colleagues from the medical and other professions, by listening, sharing and responding.
    (b) Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with individuals and groups regardless of their age, social, cultural or ethnic backgrounds or their disabilities, including when English is not the patient's first language.
    (c) Communicate by spoken, written and electronic methods (including medical records), and be aware of other methods of communication used by patients. Appreciate the significance of non-verbal communication in the medical consultation.
    (d) Communicate appropriately in difficult circumstances, such as breaking bad news, and when discussing sensitive issues, such as alcohol consumption, smoking or obesity.
    (e) Communicate appropriately with difficult or violent patients.
    (f) Communicate appropriately with people with mental illness.
    (g) Communicate appropriately with vulnerable patients.
    (h) Communicate effectively in various roles, for example as patient advocate, teacher, manager or improvement leader.
  • OFG 16. Provide immediate care in medical emergencies.
    (a) Assess and recognise the severity of a clinical presentation and a need for immediate emergency care.
    (b) Diagnose and manage acute medical emergencies.
    (c) Provide basic first aid.
    (d) Provide immediate life support.
    (e) Provide cardio-pulmonary resuscitation or direct other team members to carry out resuscitation.
  • OFG 17. Prescribe drugs safely, effectively and economically.
    (a) Establish an accurate drug history, covering both prescribed and other medication.
    (b) Plan appropriate drug therapy for common indications, including pain and distress.
    (c) Provide a safe and legal prescription.
    (d) Calculate appropriate drug doses and record the outcome accurately.
    (e) Provide patients with appropriate information about their medicines.
    (f) Access reliable information about medicines.
    (g) Detect and report adverse drug reactions.
    (h) Demonstrate awareness that many patients use complementary and alternative therapies, and awareness of the existence and range of these therapies, why patients use them, and how this might affect other types of treatment that patients are receiving.
  • OFG 18. Carry out practical procedures safely and effectively.
    (a) Be able to perform a range of diagnostic procedures, as required by the GMC and measure and record the findings.
    (b) Be able to perform a range of therapeutic procedures, as required by the GMC.
    (c) Be able to demonstrate correct practice in general aspects of practical procedures, as required by the GMC
  • OFG 19. Use information effectively in a medical context.
    (a) Keep accurate, legible and complete clinical records.
    (b) Make effective use of computers and other information systems, including storing and retrieving information.
    (c) Keep to the requirements of confidentiality and data protection legislation and codes of practice in all dealings with information.
    (d) Access information sources and use the information in relation to patient care, health promotion, advice and information to patients, and research and education.
    (e) Apply the principles, method and knowledge of health informatics to medical practice.
  • Intellectual Skills
    Skills - 1 Intellectual Attributes [QAA 5.1, 2, 3, 5]
  • 1. Graduates must demonstrate their ability to think critically by adopting reflective and inquisitive attitudes and applying rational processes and recognising the impact of their own value judgements and those of patients.
  • 2. Graduates must demonstrate proficiency in clinical reasoning through their ability to recognise, define and prioritise problems, analyse, interpret, objectively evaluate and prioritise information, recognising its limitations and recognise the limitations of knowledge in medicine and the importance of professional judgement.
  • 3. Graduates must demonstrate insight into research and scientific method through understanding and critical appreciation of methodology, formulating research questions that are pertinent to medicine, choice and application of appropriate quantitative and qualitative methodologies, recognition of the importance of rigour in collecting, analysing and interpreting data, recognition of the relationship between evidence, audit, and observed variation in clinical practice and the use research skills to develop greater understanding and to influence their practice.
  • 4. Graduates must demonstrate their ability to recognise and cope with uncertainty by accepting that uncertainty is unavoidable in the practice of medicine and using appropriate cognitive and intellectual strategies to deal with uncertainty when it arises.
  • Professional/Practical Skills
    Outcomes 3 Professional
  • OFG 20. The graduate will be able to behave according to ethical and legal principles. The graduate will be able to:
    (a) Know about and keep to the GMC's ethical guidance and standards including Good Medical Practice, the 'Duties of a doctor registered with the GMC' and supplementary ethical guidance which describe what is expected of all doctors registered with the GMC.
    (b) Demonstrate awareness of the clinical responsibilities and role of the doctor, making the care of the patient the first concern. Recognise the principles of patient-centered care, including self-care, and deal with patients' healthcare needs in consultation with them and, where appropriate, their relatives or carers.
    (c) Be polite, considerate, trustworthy and honest, act with integrity, maintain confidentiality, respect patients' dignity and privacy, and understand the importance of appropriate consent.
    (d) Respect all patients, colleagues and others regardless of their age, colour, culture, disability, ethnic or national origin, gender, lifestyle, marital or parental status, race, religion or beliefs, sex, sexual orientation, or social or economic status. Respect patients' right to hold religious or other beliefs, and take these into account when relevant to treatment options.

  • (e) Recognise the rights and the equal value of all people and how opportunities for some people may be restricted by others' perceptions.
    (f) Understand and accept the legal, moral and ethical responsibilities involved in protecting and promoting the health of individual patients, their dependants and the public including vulnerable groups such as children, older people, people with learning disabilities and people with mental illnesses.
    (g) Demonstrate knowledge of laws, and systems of professional regulation through the GMC and others, relevant to medical practice, including the ability to complete relevant certificates and legal documents and liaise with the coroner or procurator fiscal where appropriate.
  • OFG 21. Reflect, learn and teach others.
    (a) Acquire, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge, learn to adapt to changing circumstances and ensure that patients receive the highest level of professional care.
    (b) Establish the foundations for lifelong learning and continuing professional development, including a professional development portfolio containing reflections, achievements and learning needs.
    (c) Continually and systematically reflect on practice and, whenever necessary, translate that reflection into action, using improvement techniques and audit appropriately for example, by critically appraising the prescribing of others.
    (d) Manage time and prioritise tasks, and work autonomously when necessary and appropriate.
    (e) Recognise own personal and professional limits and seek help from colleagues and supervisors when necessary.
    (f) Function effectively as a mentor and teacher including contributing to the appraisal, assessment and review of colleagues, giving effective feedback, and taking advantage of opportunities to develop these skills.
  • OFG 22. Learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team.
    (a) Understand and respect the roles and expertise of health and social care professionals in the context of working and learning as a multi-professional team.
    (b) Understand the contribution that effective interdisciplinary teamworking makes to the delivery of safe and high quality care.
    (c) Work with colleagues in ways that best serve the interests of patients, passing on information and handing over care, demonstrating flexibility, adaptability and a problem-solving approach.
    (d) Demonstrate ability to build team capacity and positive working relationships and undertake various team roles including leadership and the ability to accept leadership by others.
  • OFG 23. Protect patients and improve care.
    (a) Place patients' needs and safety at the centre of the care process.
    (b) Deal effectively with uncertainty and change.
    (c) Understand the framework in which medicine is practised in the UK, including: the organisation, management and regulation of healthcare provision; the structures, functions and priorities of the NHS; and the roles of, and relationships between, the agencies and services involved in protecting and promoting individual and population health.
    (d) Promote, monitor and maintain health and safety in the clinical setting, understanding how errors can happen in practice, applying the principles of quality assurance, clinical governance and risk management to medical practice, and understanding responsibilities within the current systems for raising concerns about safety and quality.
  • (e) Understand and have experience of the principles and methods of improvement, including audit, adverse incident reporting and quality improvement, and how to use the results of audit to improve practice.
    (f) Respond constructively to the outcomes of appraisals, performance reviews and assessments.
    (g) Demonstrate awareness of the role of doctors as managers, including seeking ways to continually improve the use and prioritisation of resources.
    (h) Understand the importance of, and the need to keep to, measures to prevent the spread of infection, and apply the principles of infection prevention and control.
    (i) Recognise own personal health needs, consult and follow the advice of a suitably qualified professional, and protect patients from any risk posed by own health.
    (j) Recognise the duty to take action if a colleague's health, performance or conduct is putting patients at risk.
  • Transferable/Key Skills
  • Skills - nine general generic and transferable graduate skills
    1.Communicate effectively in various roles
    2.Acquire, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge, learn to adapt to changing circumstances
    3.Make accurate observations of biomedical phenomena
    4.Make effective use of computers and other information systems. Access information sources and use the information in relation to research and education
    5.Keep accurate, legible and complete records.
    6.Critically appraise the results of qualitative and quantitative studies as reported in the scientific literature.
    7.Formulate simple relevant research questions in biomedical science, psychosocial science or population science, and design appropriate studies or experiments to address the questions.
    8.Make judgements and decisions, based on available evidence including working in situations of uncertainty
    9.Provide basic first aid
  • Teaching and Learning for all sections if summarised
    The principal modes of teaching and learning employed are problem-based learning for the 18 month GEM Course, followed by experiential learning via full-time clinical attachments for the last 2.5 years of the programme. These are complemented by taught classes primarily in the form of lectures and practical workshops. However, these are provided in close integration to the topics and learning activities of the PBL course and the clinical attachments. Considerable emphasis throughout is on independent, student-directed learning supported by a variety of learning resources including IT, library, skills and simulation centres, and staff, anatomy and pathology resources. They also engage at several levels other health professional students in training and are designed to foster attitudes and behaviour appropriate to inter-professional learning and practice.
    Assessment for all sections if summarised
    Award of the medical degree (BM, BS) entitles a graduate to be provisionally registered by the General Medical Council (conditional on acceptance by the General Medical Council) and to practise under supervision as a Foundation Year 1 doctor. The regulation of assessment within the course and the award of the qualification, therefore, are planned to fulfil this vocational requirement.